My Space Aliens

I do have one more post to write about growing up.   I have been stepping back in time so the last one will be about my earliest memories when we lived on Hazel Street in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania.  Today I would like to talk about science fiction writing.

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If you write science fiction, you will likely create alien races sooner or later.  The creation of alien races has evolved quite a bit from H.G. Wells’ Martians in “War of the Worlds.”  There were the never-seen Krell of “Forbidden Planet”, known only by the technology that they left behind and simplistic aliens like the Mutants of “This Island Earth.”  The aliens in books were more evolved.  My favorites were the aliens created by the great science fiction writer Larry Niven.  His cat-like Kazin were the best aliens ever, and the Moties from his novel, “The Mote in God’s Eye” were fantastic.  It took Star Trek to put a real face on aliens on the screen.  Speaking of Star Trek, the Klingons were a clear variation of the Kazin.

In most stories bad things happen when humans run into aliens.  It happens if they come to us or if we go to them.  In movies like, “War of the Worlds,” “Independence Day,” and “Clover Field,” aliens showing up was a bad thing.  This is also reflected in TV shows like “Dark Skies” and “Defiance.”  There are some that treated aliens differently but, in most cases, the aliens were the bad guys.

I like to treat aliens differently.  Yes I do have bad guys, the Takelvee Hegemony in my “Solarian Defense Directorate” series has a Klingon type attitude and they are always causing trouble, but most of my aliens are not looking for trouble.  In the same series there is an advanced alien race called the Agunta.  After resolving a misunderstanding that almost started an interstellar war, they become good friends of Humanity.

Most of my aliens are actually friendly, once humanity gets to know them.  In my novel “Pioneers” the Koriman come to Earth looking for help and offering an amazing gift in return.  In my new novel “The Teacher” alien androids from a planet called Cambria land on Earth to repair their ship.  The android Selessian Argos 47 saves and befriends a blind Irish girl and sets in motion events that lead to the discovery of cold fusion in Ireland and a secret lifelong friendship between an Irish woman and an alien android.

Of all of the short stories I’ve written, my favorite is a story called “Private Arches.”  It tells of a time when an anomaly covers the Earth causing dimensional rifts.  These rifts appear as arch shaped holes that let people peer into another Earth, one far different from ours.  The arches could not be touched, only looked through.  Through one of these arches, a man and a woman become friends with an alien family.

Making aliens different from humans is the fun part of the creation process, and also the challenging part.  The Koriman and the aliens in the arches are creatures with three genders.  The Koriman call theirs male, female, and nurturer.  The female carries the eggs, the male fertilizes the eggs, and the nurturer carries the embryo to birth and cares for the children.  The transition of the embryo from the female to the nurturer is a life ending process for the female.  Go to this link and listen to a page of my audio novel.  It is the page where a Koriman is explaining their genders.

http://www.mediafire.com/listen/apux6k93x5xd4vq/00_01+Pioneers+Page+05_unknown.mp3

That’s just a little look at my version of aliens.  I would be happy to answer any questions I can for anyone who may want to try their hand at science fiction writing.

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About

Pete is a retired software developer, a writer, and a martial arts instructor. He lives in Maryland with his wife Cathy and they are enjoying their retirement. Pete is the author of four novels, "The Teacher", 500 Years from Home", and "The Long Journey Home" are available at Lulu.com; and "Pioneers" in available at the Kindle Book Store.

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Posted in Entertaiment, fiction, Movies, science fiction, Writing

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